Lymphoma trial finds combination targeted therapy effective prior to chemotherapy: MD Anderson Phase II study suggests patients with lymphoma subtype may be able to avoid chemotherapy in the future

Results of a Phase II clinical trial conducted at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed that combination targeted therapy, consisting of rituximab, lenalidomide and ibrutinib (RLI), had an 84.6 percent overall response rate (ORR) and 38.5 percent complete response rate (CRR) when given prior to any chemotherapy…

Bone cells suppress cancer metastases

In breast cancer, there are cases of women and men whose cancer returns in their bones 20-30 years after they were treated for their primary disease and thought they were cancer-free. This phenomenon always puzzled Jefferson researcher Karen Bussard, PhD. How is it possible that breast cancer cells from a…

Tumor mutations may predict response to immunotherapy

Checkpoint inhibitor drugs that stimulate the immune system have become a growing success story in the treatment of some cancers. But about half of patients whose tumors are marked by a large number of mutations from so-called mismatch repair genetic deficiency fail to respond to the drugs. Now, researchers from…

Multiple myeloma: DNA rearrangement may predict poor outcomes

A certain type of DNA marker predicts poor outcomes in multiple myeloma, researchers at Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University have found. The marker is a kind of rearrangement of chromosomes that is rarely tested for, but may indicate resistance to immunomodulatory drugs such as lenalidomide, which have become standard therapies…

Parasitic worms cause cancer — and could help cure it

Billions worldwide are infected with tropical worms. Unsurprisingly, most of these people live in poor countries, kept poor by the effects of worm-related malnourishment. What may surprise many is that worms also cause the majority of cases of some cancers in these countries. Published in Frontiers in Medicine as a…

Potential way to improve cancer surgery outcomes by managing nontraditional risk factors: Depression, lack of coping strategies, availability of patient’s ’emergency’ resources tied to complications

In a study of 142 patients preparing for cancer surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that psychological or social risk factors such as depression, limited resilience and lack of emergency resources along with standard medical risk factors such as high blood pressure or diabetes are linked with…