How rotavirus causes severe gastrointestinal disease

Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea and vomiting, especially in children, that results in approximately 128,000 deaths annually. The virus triggers the disease by infecting enterocyte cells in the small intestine, but only a fraction of the susceptible cells has the virus. In the mid-90s, scientists proposed that the…

Allergies Won’t Up Your Odds for Severe COVID

MONDAY, Nov. 16, 2020 — In a study of hospitalized patients who had COVID-19, outcomes for those who had allergies were similar to those of other patients, a new study reports. The findings were scheduled to be presented to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), which was…

Your blood type may predict your risk for severe COVID-19

(HealthDay)—There’s more evidence that blood type may affect a person’s risk for COVID-19 and severe illness from the disease. The findings are reported in a pair of studies published Oct. 14 in the journal Blood Advances. In one, researchers compared more than 473,000 people in Denmark with COVID-19 to more…

How chemicals like PFAS can increase your risk of severe COVID-19

Nearly a year before the novel coronavirus emerged, Dr. Leonardo Trasande published “Sicker, Fatter, Poorer,” a book about connections between environmental pollutants and many of the most common chronic illnesses. The book describes decades of scientific research showing how endocrine-disrupting chemicals, present in our daily lives and now found in…

Obesity ups odds for severe COVID-19 in younger patients

It’s clear that age and chronic disease make bouts of the pandemic coronavirus more severe—and even deadly—but obesity might also put even younger people at higher risk, a pair of new studies suggest. The researchers suspect that inflammation throughout the body linked to obesity could be a powerful factor in…

Smoldering spots in the brain may signal severe MS

Aided by a high-powered brain scanner and a 3-D printer, NIH researchers peered inside the brains of hundreds of multiple sclerosis patients and found that dark rimmed spots representing ongoing, “smoldering” inflammation, called chronic active lesions, may be a hallmark of more aggressive and disabling forms of the disease. “We…